Accomadating iol europe

27-Dec-2017 02:04

Lindstrom (1995) stated that radial keratotomy (RK) is a common surgical technique for correcting myopia.

The RK incisions, like any corneal incisions, permanently weaken the cornea and this structural weakening can cause several complications and side effects, including diurnal fluctuation, progressive hyperopic shift, and the potential for traumatic rupture of the keratotomy scars.

The AAO's position on RK was reaffirmed in the 1997 AAO Preferred Practice Pattern on Refractive Errors, which restated that RK is indicated for "[l]ow to moderate myopia".

This researcher described a new technique -- minimally invasive RK (mini-RK) -- that reduces the millimeters of cornea incised and presented preliminary laboratory and clinical results.

In a cadaver eye study, 8 short, deep incisions extending from the 3.0 mm optical zone to the 7.0 mm optical zone produced 92 % of the efficacy of full-length incisions to the 11.0 mm optical zone.

Although technically the same procedure, PTK is used for the correction of particular corneal diseases, whereas PRK involves use of the excimer laser for correction of refractive errors (e.g., myopia, hyperopia, astigmatism, and presbyopia) in persons with otherwise non-diseased corneas.

Penetrating keratoplasty is considered investigational when performed solely to correct astigmatism or other refractive errors because its effectiveness for these indications has not been established.

The AAO's position on RK was reaffirmed in the 1997 AAO Preferred Practice Pattern on Refractive Errors, which restated that RK is indicated for "[l]ow to moderate myopia".

This researcher described a new technique -- minimally invasive RK (mini-RK) -- that reduces the millimeters of cornea incised and presented preliminary laboratory and clinical results.

In a cadaver eye study, 8 short, deep incisions extending from the 3.0 mm optical zone to the 7.0 mm optical zone produced 92 % of the efficacy of full-length incisions to the 11.0 mm optical zone.

Although technically the same procedure, PTK is used for the correction of particular corneal diseases, whereas PRK involves use of the excimer laser for correction of refractive errors (e.g., myopia, hyperopia, astigmatism, and presbyopia) in persons with otherwise non-diseased corneas.

Penetrating keratoplasty is considered investigational when performed solely to correct astigmatism or other refractive errors because its effectiveness for these indications has not been established.

Deep lamellar keratoplasty for refractory corneal haze after refractive surgery was useful in this eye.