Facebook dating site tagged comments

06-Sep-2017 11:45

Innocent, normal kids who took their lives after being bullied on social networking sites. My flippant remarks about the downside of Facebook provoked a huge debate.Some accused me of being a fuddy-duddy, the cyber equivalent of a grumpy old woman.These online relationships can build up very quickly, they can be very secretive and, as a result, the people involved can feel special.It's like being in an exclusive club no one knows about. People who work with children's charities can always tell the kids who have spent too much time online - they shun eye contact and have trouble connecting with other people. If kids are shy and insecure about their appearance or their conversational skills, then the internet seems like a great place to make friends and create a social scene - as Ashleigh Hall found out to her cost.Clearly, this is impossible - so the system relies on users making complaints.And if those users are already lying about their age and their sex and creating cyber versions of their personalities that bear very little resemblance to the real teenager or middle-aged paedophile, then it's expecting a lot from this motley army of users suddenly to morph into responsible net police, online Mr Plods who will spend time ratting on their mates for posting pictures of themselves holding guns, knives, or pictures of their naughty bits.The most important thing to remember about young people using the internet is that they have little privacy in the real world.Adolescents need a haven to escape to - and the internet provides the perfect place to set your own rules and talk to your chosen circle of confidants in a secret language.

facebook dating site tagged comments-12

Although Facebook proudly tells us that their users have to be 13 to sign up, who's doing the checking?An EU study of online behaviour found that 40 per cent of teenagers had seen pornography and 20 per cent had been bullied. The amount of time people now spend on social networking sites has soared to six hours a week - that's up more than 80 per cent in a year, and the longer we spend online, the harder it is to connect with the real world.Psychologist Arthur Cassidy says that friendships forged via social networking sites and messaging services are different to those we make in the real world.The fact is, Facebook is unstoppable, so there's no point in talking about policing it, censoring it or shutting it down. Look at the sheer volume of stuff - more than five billion pieces of content, web links, news stories, blog posts and photos, are shared on the site worldwide each week.How do you sift through a tsunami of trivia like that?

Although Facebook proudly tells us that their users have to be 13 to sign up, who's doing the checking?An EU study of online behaviour found that 40 per cent of teenagers had seen pornography and 20 per cent had been bullied. The amount of time people now spend on social networking sites has soared to six hours a week - that's up more than 80 per cent in a year, and the longer we spend online, the harder it is to connect with the real world.Psychologist Arthur Cassidy says that friendships forged via social networking sites and messaging services are different to those we make in the real world.The fact is, Facebook is unstoppable, so there's no point in talking about policing it, censoring it or shutting it down. Look at the sheer volume of stuff - more than five billion pieces of content, web links, news stories, blog posts and photos, are shared on the site worldwide each week.How do you sift through a tsunami of trivia like that?In the past two years, the number of 12- to 15-year-olds with internet access in their bedrooms has soared from 20 to 35 per cent.