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03-Oct-2017 16:15

Poles are also sensitive to any attempt to minimize their suffering during World War II.Three million Poles were killed during the war and Polish resistance was widespread.In his book The Righteous: Unsung Heroes of the Holocaust, the late Oxford historian Martin Gilbert documented some of these individual cases and the grave dangers Poles faced in aiding Jews.He quotes a Jewish resident of the Warsaw Ghetto, Emanuel Ringelblum, who wrote in his diary that on November 18, 1940 – the day the Jews were confined to the ghetto – “many Christians brought bread for the Jewish acquaintances and friends”. One Christian Pole was observed “throwing a sack of bread over the wall” – and was promptly murdered by the Nazis for aiding Jews. Yet historians have also documented many troubling instances of Polish antisemitism during the Holocaust as well.instead of subjecting the violence to unambiguous criticism, church leaders rather gave explanations for antisemitism that ultimately served to justify it.” (The Catholic Church and Antisemitism: Poland 1933-1939. Former Harvard History Professor Daniel Jonah Goldhagen similarly documented widespread anti-Jewish feeling in Poland’s religious leadership in his book A Moral Reckoning: The Role of the Catholic Church in the Holocaust and its Unfulfilled Duty of Repair (Alfred A. One was the massacre of the Jews of Jedwabne in July 1941.The Polish town of Jedwabne was home to about 2,000 Jews on the eve of the Holocaust, about 60-70% of the total population.

After the war, while the West was able to reflect on what had happened, Stalinist terror stymied public discussion in Poland about the war, the Holocaust and anti-Semitism.” Yet to erase Polish culpability for any part of the Holocaust distorts history.

In Jedwabne, for instance, an official monument declared “Place of martyrdom of the Jewish people.

Hitler's Gestapo and gendarmerie burned 1,600 people alive, July 10, 1941.” No mention was made of the large role ordinary Poles played in the massacre.

On July 10 – less than three weeks after Nazi forces gained control of that area – the town’s Polish mayor, Marian Karolak and local Nazi officials gave orders to round up the town’s Jews – both long-term residents as well as Jews who were sheltering there.

Some Jews were hunted down and killed by the town’s residents with clubs, axes and knives.

After the war, while the West was able to reflect on what had happened, Stalinist terror stymied public discussion in Poland about the war, the Holocaust and anti-Semitism.” Yet to erase Polish culpability for any part of the Holocaust distorts history.In Jedwabne, for instance, an official monument declared “Place of martyrdom of the Jewish people.Hitler's Gestapo and gendarmerie burned 1,600 people alive, July 10, 1941.” No mention was made of the large role ordinary Poles played in the massacre.On July 10 – less than three weeks after Nazi forces gained control of that area – the town’s Polish mayor, Marian Karolak and local Nazi officials gave orders to round up the town’s Jews – both long-term residents as well as Jews who were sheltering there.Some Jews were hunted down and killed by the town’s residents with clubs, axes and knives.Enough with this lie, there must be accountability,” Minister Ziobro told Polish radio on Saturday, February 13, 2016. Poles are rightly very sensitive to depictions of their country; its wartime history is complex.